Author Topic: Root invasion into vege garden  (Read 2039 times)

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Offline Matt

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Re: Root invasion into vege garden
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2017, 02:54:51 AM »
Hi Camerons

Thanks for the update i have another plan too, that fenceline on that side is no good i'll replace it and in the process that vine will have to go to.but it will come back its everyhere.

Ill still put a root barrier along that fence line, and weedmatting in the beds, all doubled too.

i was only gonna use the herbicide one on the fenceline not in the beds.

thanks for the unfo ill post pics of what i do when i get into it and update results



Offline Matt

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Re: Root invasion into vege garden
« Reply #26 on: January 31, 2017, 11:33:09 AM »
I just rand the people at permathene  who supply geofabric and weedmatand explained my situation - they told me defintely dont go for geofabric its is far too soft and the roots will go straight through it. ITs is purely an aggregate separation material according to them.
So i guess its a double layer.....1 x weedmat and 1 x geofabric in the beds just to cover all bases.
And some root barrier plastic around the outer perimiter of the beds.
IF lining the garden beds with this double later of weedmat and non woven geo fabric.......what is the depth consideration? is 50cm enough?
Growing carrots, tomoatoes, broccoli, lettuce, cabbage, eggplant, cucumber, basil, rockmelon, cauliflower, strawberies (not really considering potatoes and other tubers apart from betroot accasionally)
Thx again
Matt

Offline Grub

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Re: Root invasion into vege garden
« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2017, 10:24:59 PM »
I'll going to try the geofabric in one bed. If it does a 50% reduction in tree roots getting in that's good enough for me, it was only $30 for a 10m roll. I have a giant oak tree 20m from my yard and another one 40m the other way so there are always going to be feeder roots looking for goodies. I'm resigned to the fact it's going to leech nutrients and water from my beds and I'll have to dig them up once or twice a year to get good results (good exercise).
Cool region, Canberra. Courtyard and balcony gardener.
http://actgarden.blogspot.com/

Offline Bev

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  • 40 km SE Melbourne
    • foodnstuff
Re: Root invasion into vege garden
« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2017, 01:30:12 PM »
Hi Matt, only just caught up with this thread. I grow my veggies in wicking boxes.....large plastic crates. See link here— https://foodnstuff.wordpress.com/water-wicking-boxes/. Unfortunately it's an old link; I don't add to it any more, but if you search the main blog you'll find I tend to write about them all the time. You can go for deeper boxes if you want, although most veggies don't have deep root systems (tomatoes do well for me). They'll definitely keep roots out. Shame to waste that nice greenhouse setup because of a few roots.

Offline Grub

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Re: Root invasion into vege garden
« Reply #29 on: April 02, 2017, 12:02:32 AM »
I dug over the two small beds. Even though these are only 1m square each it was 2 days work - tried my best to sift the soil out of the gravel layer too. I then put two layers of geotextile fabric over the gravel and filled them back in. I will have a look how they go over the cool season in keeping roots out to decide if I do the main bed, which will be a lot more work. If they keep out even 75% of the roots I'll be happy. It's good anyway to have something to keep soil going down into the gravel layer, if I'd know about this material I'd have used it in the first place at least for that.
Cool region, Canberra. Courtyard and balcony gardener.
http://actgarden.blogspot.com/

Offline Grub

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Re: Root invasion into vege garden
« Reply #30 on: September 22, 2017, 02:45:24 PM »
Okay, that was a morning (more like half a day) of backbreaking work. Thankfully my back held up, bit sore though as are my shoulders.

Main bed completely dug out (a challenge with the limited space in the courtyard), quite a bit of sifting of the gravel layer at the bottom to reclaim as much soil as was practical, lining with several layers of geotextile fabric and then filled back in. Thankfully filling it back in was not nearly as hard as digging it out.

You can see the problem with roots getting in in the shot of the gravel. I'm not expecting none to get in, but if it blocks 80% or more that will be good enough for me, the roots won't be able to steal more in nutrients than I am layering on top each year.

Now I haven't yet checked the small beds to see how well they fared up over autumn and winter with their geotextile. If I stick a fork in there and it's clogged with roots anyway, I'm definitely going to get that sinking feeling.
Cool region, Canberra. Courtyard and balcony gardener.
http://actgarden.blogspot.com/