Author Topic: Old Grapevine - Rotten & Fragile  (Read 165 times)

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Offline Barboots

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Old Grapevine - Rotten & Fragile
« on: October 06, 2017, 06:54:35 PM »
I have an old block with some 1950's grapevines on it. They've been pruned a bit to produce more fruit, but most have severely compromised trunks... maybe white ant, wood rot or disease. Amazingly they keep going.

A large gumtree fell on the supporting structure, and I'd like to take the opportunity to redirect the growth. I suspect if I move the vine in the direction I want it to grow it will fracture. I'd hate to lose these classic vines.

I read several posts about cutting them off just above ground level and having them re-sprout... and am looking for advice as to whether this would be assured with these particular examples. They are all still fruiting, despite the seemingly impossible potential of the trunk condition.

Cheers, Steve

Photos... and more on request:

Offline Raymondo

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  • Northern Tablelands, N.S.W.
Re: Old Grapevine - Rotten & Fragile
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 08:50:31 AM »
I doubt you could move existing hardwood but you could train the new grwoth in the direction you want. If the original was grafted, which may no longer be readily visible, then cutting it off at the base would allow whatver the rootstock was to grow, at the expense of the fruit you want.
Next winter, you could take lots of cuttings and strike them. Once growing happily you could then even rip out the old and replace them with the new vines.
Ray, gardening on an old flood plain with clay loam from 30 to 60 cm deep over clay.

Offline Barboots

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Re: Old Grapevine - Rotten & Fragile
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 07:27:13 PM »
If the original was grafted, which may no longer be readily visible, then cutting it off at the base would allow whatver the rootstock was to grow...
Thanks for your reply Raymondo. These vines were planted around 1950... wouldn't that mean that it's very unlikely there was grafting involved? Following on from that... if not grafted, does that mean it's not possible to cut them back at the ground and expect them to re-sprout?

Cheers,
Steve


Offline Raymondo

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  • Northern Tablelands, N.S.W.
Re: Old Grapevine - Rotten & Fragile
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 08:14:44 PM »
I guess it’s likely that the vines weren’t grafted back then, but who knows. I would take cuttings, get them growing, then cut back. If it doesn’t resprout, at least you’ll have fresh vines to replace it with.
Ray, gardening on an old flood plain with clay loam from 30 to 60 cm deep over clay.