Author Topic: Bunya nuts  (Read 423 times)

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Offline rowan

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    • Garden Larder
Bunya nuts
« on: April 13, 2017, 03:37:40 PM »
How disappointing. A local Bunya pine dropped a couple of cones a couple of weeks ago so I collected the seeds to cook up. After boiling them for the recommended half hour I was disappointed to find that most of the nuts didn't have seeds in them, and of the rest, they just tasted like potato. Really boring.
Oh well, you gotta try these things.
Casterton, Victoria
Rare and unusual vegetable seed farm

Offline Templeton

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  • Bendigo, Victoria
    • T's Mendelania
Re: Bunya nuts
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2017, 08:15:39 PM »
I thought you roasted them
T

Offline rowan

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Re: Bunya nuts
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2017, 04:55:20 PM »
You can do both so I understand. I am not going to bother testing the roasting method.
Casterton, Victoria
Rare and unusual vegetable seed farm

Offline Templeton

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    • T's Mendelania
Re: Bunya nuts
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2017, 06:20:04 PM »
Yep, if you want roast potato flavour, probably easier to roast potatoes :)


Mind you would be fun to plant some.
T

Offline solanum

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  • SE Qld
Re: Bunya nuts
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2017, 07:56:25 PM »
I have always found Bunya nuts very tasty and with a flavour quite different to potatoes; more like chestnuts with a pine-y aftertaste. Here (SE Qld) they are usually harvested in late Jan - mid-Feb. I cook them like you do, boiled in salted water. The surplus gets frozen for future use, including as a side-dish to the Christmas bird...

Offline Raymondo

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  • Northern Tablelands, N.S.W.
Re: Bunya nuts
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2017, 01:59:31 PM »
Bit late but ... roasting raw bunyas makes the starch harden into a stone-like substance. Totally inedible IMHO. Once boiled though, they can be used in many ways - eaten as is, dried and ground into a flour, roasted and so on. Same as chestnuts, once they're boiled.
Ray, gardening on an old flood plain with clay loam from 30 to 60 cm deep over clay.