Author Topic: Killing Blue Morning Glory (Ipomoea indica) with Dicamba M....hopefully  (Read 594 times)

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Offline Cam

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  • Posts: 7
Hi all,

A long time ago the previous owner of our home planted Blue morning glory along our fence line.  Although I could see it being a nice plant if contained, in the environment I live in, in NSW it is definitely a noxious weed and is unstoppable and a drive through our local state forest shows it to be as invasive as lantana.

Over about 10 years we have tried unsuccessfully to eradicate it from our yard, by removing all visible traces of it, but with personal health issues preventing consistency, it eventually returns, usually worse than before. Every year we go to Tocal (field day) where there is always a stand being run by the State Forestry Commission who offer free advice on weed control, but every year we are told their is no herbicide effective against Blue morning glory.

A few weeks ago, I came across this fact sheet:

https://www.moretonbay.qld.gov.au/uploadedFiles/moretonbay/environment/vegetation/blue-morning-glory-using-kamba-m.pdf

It has been put out by Morton bay council and seems to give hope that there may be an effective herbicide (dicamba m). I have been searching the web since and found some other mention, but very little on the subject. Given my vendetta with this weed, I thought I might document the effect of using dicamba m with some photographs as I go through the process, and my aim is to continue to post the results long term, in the hope it will help someone in the future who is also struggling to control Blue morning glory.

I followed the instructions listed in the fact sheet, although the concentration used was 4ml/L as when mixing to 10L spray pack the bottle doesn't really allow me to measure precisely to 36ml, so it's about 40ml I used in every 10L. I purchased a 1L bottle of the herbicide (it was not the named brand, but has the same active ingredients in the same ratios).

Here is a photo of one of the main problem areas:



Cheers,

Cam

Offline Cam

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  • Posts: 7
I wasn't sure if I could post pictures yet (as I am a new member), but it seems to have worked.

I am currently at day 4 after spraying, here are 3 more images of days 1,2,4







As you can see, even one day after spraying, it was already clear the morning glory wasn't happy (fingers crossed, this is a positive sign of how effective it will be).

Yesterday saw some leaves turning yellow:



Cheers,

Cam

Offline Whwoz

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  • Posts: 173
Keep up the good work Cam.  Always useful to see this sort of info made available to others who may have a similar problem.

Welcome to Ozgrow.

Woz
Woz

Trafalgar Vic

Offline Cam

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  • Posts: 7
Keep up the good work Cam.  Always useful to see this sort of info made available to others who may have a similar problem.

Welcome to Ozgrow.

Woz

Thanks Woz.

Offline Cam

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  • Posts: 7
It's day 7 today, here is another photo:



At first glance it doesn't look like much has changed, and I keep reminding myself that the fact sheet mentions being patient. The main thing that I notice so far is sections have let go of the main vine and dropped to the ground (I can see more parts of fence now), and a lot more leaves are turning yellow.

I am thinking I might give it another dose this weekend (as the vine is very thick, so I'm certain there are many leaves that did not get wet first time around, so more opportunity to get the pesticide into the vine).

Offline Cam

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Day 16



Starting to see some obvious difference now, a lot of the under leaves look completely dead.  I didn't end up doing a second spray, so this is still just the original spray.

Offline pinefamily

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  • Mid North SA; warm temperate climate
Knowing how rampant it is, I would suggest to start cutting it back, and then give it a second spray.

Offline Cam

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  • Posts: 7
Knowing how rampant it is, I would suggest to start cutting it back, and then give it a second spray.

Pinefamily,

I have to admit it is very tempting to get in and start cutting things back, but the reading I have done suggests that is more likely to be counter productive when using DicambaM. This herbicide makes its way through the leaves, so if there is still healthy foliage, the recommendation seems to be leave the vine intact and respray. The issue is, that by cutting back and then spraying, if a section of vine has no leaves, the DicambaM will be ineffective to that vine, and it is more likely to survive dormant, only to once again start growing in the future.

I was planning on respraying, but I didn't get time, and now I am seeing results, I have decided to be patient and see what happens (more as an experiment for this post than anything else), if it starts to pick up again, I will respray.

Here is how the vine sits today, it's clearly struggling now:





Cheers,

Cam


Offline Cam

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28 days since being sprayed I am very happy!!



 

I am going to leave it until it all looks dry before removing (just to be certain any broken bits are completely dead).

After so many years of failed attempts, this is by far looking like the most promising. I will try to continue to post over time to update on the long term results. I hope this post proves useful for someone in the future, and I can save someone from going through what I have looking for a solution.

Cheers,

Cam

Offline bender

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Looks like an excellent result. Thanks for posting your progress shots


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