Author Topic: First time growing beans  (Read 219 times)

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Offline pinefamily

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  • Mid North SA; warm temperate climate
First time growing beans
« on: August 20, 2017, 09:02:11 AM »
Hi all,
This year will be my first serious attempt at growing beans; I did plant some seeds last year, but suspect it was too late as they never came up.
I want to grow both bush and climbing varieties, but plan on separate beds. Any tips or advice?

Thanks in advance.

Offline Templeton

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2017, 01:45:36 PM »
I think MurrayTart is your expert, but a couple of pointers - I presume we are talking green beans for fresh eating rather than dry beans?


Pre-soaking overnight can help germination.
Plant into damp warm ground, give them one light water to settle in, then don't re-water until they emerge. Seed can rot in wet cold soil.


Mice like to eat seed in the soil.


Try a few different varieties - Fabaceaeporn available at inspiration seeds in tassie.


Stagger planting of bush beans to spread harvest.
Pick regularly every couple of days.
Pod set can be adversely affected by hot weather.
t


Offline Raymondo

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2017, 08:43:25 PM »
Love beans. I grow both fresh and dry beans. For fresh eating my favourites are Dragon Tongue (bush) and Rattlesnake (climber). I like snake beans too and grow one called Malay Snake every year. Snake beans prefer it warmer than common beans. I sow both at the same time but the snake beans take a lot longer to start producing but continue long after the common beans have passed their prime. I also grow lots of different dry beans though not all at once. This coming season I'll be growing Pinto and Great Northern beans for dry beans.
Ray, gardening on an old flood plain with clay loam from 30 to 60 cm deep over clay.

Offline Grub

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2017, 10:23:59 PM »
Beans are very easy to grow. Only problems I've had were spider mites, which I have taken knocking off with the hose spray. The other thing is that you are wasting your time if you start them too early as they like the warm weather and hate the cool of early spring where I live (germinate slowly and tend to sulk, even die off) although in SA you shouldn't have this problem.

I find bush beans a bit of a waste of space but they can give you beans quicker than climbing ones for sure. For climbers give them something thicker to climb (like bamboo rather than wire) if you do them on a teepee. If you are growing it on a wire trellis say, up a fence, tip prune them at about 2 feet so they branch out early. This stops them getting too top heavy.
Cool region, Canberra. Courtyard and balcony gardener.
http://actgarden.blogspot.com/

Offline pinefamily

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2017, 09:33:19 AM »
Thanks everyone for the tips and advice.
I want to try growing climbers with corn (Three Sisters style), so how do I not water the beans after planting in this scenario? Everything I've read or seen on YouTube doesn't mention anything. Obviously I still need to water the corn.
Snake beans sound interesting. I will give them a try if the "normal" climbers don't work out in our warmer climate.
I want to grow bush beans mainly for the yellow beans that my wife and I both love.









Offline Templeton

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2017, 10:32:15 AM »
Some discussion on US forums suggest that not all beans are adapted for 3 sisters plantings. Carol Deppe discusses this in one of her books. I have no experience with this sort of planting. I think the no -watering hint is about over watering - so that the seed rots before it emerges, esp in cold ground.
T

Offline pinefamily

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2017, 10:52:00 AM »
Thanks, Templeton. If I wait until the ground is warmer, probably early September up here, I should be ok. At the worst, this will be a trial and a learning experience. I will post progress updates for interest and future reference.

Offline SeanD

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2017, 01:34:51 PM »
I'm quite fond of the purple climbing beans

I'm probably doing it wrong but I plant them around the base of my stone fruit trees and they climb all over them

Never been too stressed about the pre soaking or not watering, I just poke them in around the garden anywhere they might find something to climb

I've also popped seeds into the aquaponics bed and had no issues

My lack of conformance to the popular wisdom comes mostly from ignorance initially, followed by "why bother" when everything just works

Offline pinefamily

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2017, 03:36:21 PM »
Hi Sean,
Thanks. You've given me confidence that I might succeed. Hopefully the hot summer up here doesn't kill them. I can't remember what varieties I have, except for the yellow beans.

How's your orchard and aquaponics coming along?

Offline Templeton

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2017, 05:54:03 PM »
I'm quite fond of the purple climbing beans

I'm probably doing it wrong but I plant them around the base of my stone fruit trees and they climb all over them
Never been too stressed about the pre soaking or not watering, I just poke them in around the garden anywhere they might find something to climb
I've also popped seeds into the aquaponics bed and had no issues
My lack of conformance to the popular wisdom comes mostly from ignorance initially, followed by "why bother" when everything just works
Great approach, Sean, do what works  ??++ .
We can often over-complicate gardening - it is really pretty straight forward - until it's not ;)
T

Offline pinefamily

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  • Mid North SA; warm temperate climate
Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2017, 05:58:08 PM »
Thinking about it, if I grow the beans with the corn, the corn should help shade the beans a little, hopefully protecting them from potential scorching.

Offline Raymondo

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2017, 08:44:57 AM »
Not wanting to put a damper on things but the three sisters (corn, beans, pumpkin) were all grown for winter food. The corn varieties were flour/flint types, not sweet, and the beans were for the dry bean, not pods, and weren't full climbers but semi-dwarf types, what the Americans call half-runners. Once planted, everything was left until it had dried down in autumn then harvested and stored for winter use.
Presumably, you're growing sweet corn and beans for the pods. In this case, I would definitely tip prune the beans once they get to a certain height otherwise they'll swamp the corn. Don't sow the beans until the corn has three leaves unfurled otherwise you risk the beans shading out the corn before it has a chance to establish.
I'm going to be trying this out this year but l'm using a feed corn (for the chickens) and a dry bean and they won't get any water except what falls from the sky. We look like having a very dry start to spring but I'm hoping that will change by November when I plant out things like corn and beans.
Ray, gardening on an old flood plain with clay loam from 30 to 60 cm deep over clay.

Offline pinefamily

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2017, 09:54:35 AM »
Thanks Raymondo. I was starting to realize the same thing from watching YouTube clips from the US. And thanks for the tips on growing the sweetcorn and beans.
As you say, it's worth a try, even as a modification to the original idea. Dry beans aren't really an option for me, as I am the only one that can eat them. My wife has a medical condition that precludes her from most legumes. Green beans and green peas are two exceptions. And sweetcorn is the best choice for us because not only can we eat it, but our parrots enjoy it (a lot).
Another thing I've learned from the clips is plant the cucurbit of choice on the outside of the corn and bean groupings, otherwise the corn and beans overshadow the growing plant.

Offline Grub

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Re: First time growing beans
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2017, 03:25:08 PM »
When I tried the 3 sisters method my beans grew vigorously and ended up choking/pulling down some of the corn stalks. So either go very easy with the beans or use bush beans, or make sure you give the corn a big head start. My 2c.
Cool region, Canberra. Courtyard and balcony gardener.
http://actgarden.blogspot.com/